Strategic Initiatives
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Sky warns UK regulators it could close Sky News if ownership of the channel gets in the way of a takeover by 21st Century Fox or "other corporate opportunities" (Financial Times)

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Sky has threatened to close down Sky News if its ownership of the channel becomes a regulatory impediment to the proposed £11.7bn takeover of the European pay-television operator by Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox.

Sky warned in a submission to the Competition Markets Authority, which is scrutinising the deal, that the continued operation of Sky News should not be assumed in light of concerns that the Fox takeover could harm media plurality in the UK.

Sky said it would be “review [its] position” in the event that the “continued provision of Sky News” impeded the Fox deal or “other corporate opportunities”.

Its submission comes amid ongoing questions about the Murdoch family’s ability to close the deal and revelations that the family has held deal talks with Walt Disney regarding a sale of most of its assets – including its 39 per cent stake in Sky.

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2017. All rights reserved. You may share using our article tools. Please don't copy articles from FT.com and redistribute by email or post to the web.

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bogorad
39 days ago
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вот верный тон разговора с вонючими регуляторами!
Moscow, Russia
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The risk of billionaire-funded media, the importance of archiving, and other takeaways from the demise of DNAInfo and Gothamist

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What billionaires giveth, billionaires can taketh away.

DNAinfo and Gothamist, two popular local news networks, were abruptly shutdown last night, just a week after employees of companies voted to unionize. Billionaire Joe Ricketts, who launched DNAInfo in 2009 and acquired Gothamist last year, wrote that while the two sites had accomplished much over the years (9 million unique visits a day) “that progress hasn’t been sufficient to support the tremendous effort and expense needed to produce the type of journalism on which the company was founded.” Of course the timing of the news lent itself to a different conclusion: rather than recognize the sites’ unionization efforts, Ricketts (who hasn’t kept secrets his distaste for unions) decided to shut them down. Adding insult to injury, the dozens DNAinfo and Gothamist employees (which included both writers and salespeople) were themselves blindsided by the news, which many learned of via the message that all the sites’ links redirected to.

Here are some early takeaways.

Perhaps billionaires aren’t the ideal benefactors for news. The success of Jeff Bezos-backed Washington Post and Pierre Omidyar’s First Look Media have been encouraging signs that, news organizations can thrive and do good work under a billionaire aligned with their efforts. Joe Ricketts offers a counterargument. Signs that Ricketts didn’t hold journalistic independence sacrosanct came soon after DNAinfo acquired Gothamist LLC, which promptly deleted at least five stories since 2010 about its new owner.

Archive, archive, archive. While The Times has confirmed that there are efforts underway at DNAinfo to archive the sites, there are already multiple external underway as well. Developers @xn9q8h and @turtlekiosk wrote The Gothamist Archive Retrieval Tool, which Gothamist and DNAinfo writers can use to recover their clips from the Google AMP caches of the two sites. Paul Ford created a spreadsheet that links to over 50,000 deleted articles, though it only works with Gothamist.com at the moment. And then there’s the The Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine, which has also been a valuable resource for writers. Erin Kissane at OpenNews has the most complete collection of the archiving efforts.

Another black eye for local news. While the early reaction to the news has rightfully focused on how it will affect the dozens of people who find themselves suddenly unemployed, it’s worth remembering that many people in local communities (and, yes, big media rich cities like New York and San Francisco) relied on the sites for local news. It’s been a rough 24 hours for them as well.

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bogorad
40 days ago
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статью уже выпилили, но интернет помнит всё.
Moscow, Russia
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Source: Intel and AMD are teaming up for a new laptop chip that combines an Intel processor and an AMD graphics unit, in a bid to compete with Nvidia (Ted Greenwald/Wall Street Journal)

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The Intel booth at the Tokyo Game Show in September; the company is teaming up with rival Advanced Micro Devices on a PC chip that combines an Intel processor and an AMD graphics unit, the better to game with.
The Intel booth at the Tokyo Game Show in September; the company is teaming up with rival Advanced Micro Devices on a PC chip that combines an Intel processor and an AMD graphics unit, the better to game with. Photo: Akio Kon/Bloomberg News

Intel Corp. INTC -1.61% and Advanced Micro Devices Inc., AMD 2.49% archrivals for decades, are teaming up to thwart a common competitor, Nvidia Corp. NVDA 1.34%

Intel planned to announce Monday a laptop-computer chip that combines an Intel processor and an AMD graphics unit, according to a person familiar with the matter. The chip is intended for laptops that are thin and lightweight but powerful enough to run high-end videogames—attributes that lately have been driving sales in an otherwise waning market for personal computers.

It will be the competitors’ first collaboration since the 1980s, said analyst Patrick Moorhead of Moor Insights & Strategy, and reflects complex shifting dynamics in the semiconductor industry.

For decades, Intel and AMD have scrapped for market share in PC chips. Intel has been dominant for much of that time, lately holding a nearly 100% share, according to Mercury Research. But AMD recently launched chips that represent the first real competition for Intel in that market for years.

AMD also recently revamped its graphics-chip designs, looking to take share away from Nvidia, which has nearly 80% of the market for stand-alone graphics chips by revenue.

AMD headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif. The company recently revamped it graphics-chips designs, the better to take on market leader Nvidia.
AMD headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif. The company recently revamped it graphics-chips designs, the better to take on market leader Nvidia. Photo: Paul Sakuma/Associated Press

Intel competes head-on with Nvidia in driving artificial-intelligence calculations for large internet companies. For several quarters, Nvidia’s business selling chips to data centers has been up by triple digits from the previous year, presumably displacing sales of Intel processors. Intel last year acquired technology to compete for that business with the purchase of Nervana Systems, and it expects those chips to start shipping by the end of the year.

Gaming PCs typically require both Intel processors and high-end graphics chips from AMD or Nvidia. Intel’s new product give it a shot at some of the revenue that usually goes to those graphics chips, while generating new sales for AMD and muscling in on Nvidia’s dominance in graphics units.

“Strategically, Intel is more comfortable competing with AMD than Nvidia,” Mr. Moorhead said. “They feel like they know what to do to compete,” so they can afford to cooperate to some degree.

An AMD spokesman said that laptops built on Intel’s new chip won’t compete directly with those based on AMD’s coming Ryzen Mobile, another power-efficient chip that combines general-purpose processing and graphics. The Intel chip will appeal to serious gamers, he said. The AMD unit, which the company expects to ship by the end of the year, is capable of running games, but not specialized for that purpose.

“We’re playing in a complementary market,” the spokesman said. said.

Write to Ted Greenwald at Ted.Greenwald@wsj.com

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bogorad
41 days ago
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охренеть
Moscow, Russia
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13:42 Citymapper начал учитывать закрытие станций метро при построении маршрута

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bogorad
48 days ago
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..у них и этого раньше не было!(с)
Moscow, Russia
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Delaying Chinese Global Dominance

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The 19th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party is over.  It was a seminal event.  It...

  • ...firmly consolidated political power in the hands of a single man, Xi (no successor was named).
  • ...clearly informed the world that China was now a global superpower (and the US was its only rival).
  • ...would promote a world based on 'capitalism with Chinese characteristics' (a capitalism in a Leninist cage) in opposition to Western Democracy.

In short, China publicly announced that it is now in a 'cold economic war' with the US for the future of the world.  In fact, China was so confident of its eventual victory, it clearly articulated the centerpiece of their effort to accomplish it:  one belt one road    

  • It's an investment of $8 trillion (to start!) to build a global road, rail and maritime system that connects Asia, Africa, and South America (60 countries in total) to China.  
  • Transportation is a natural monopoly.  Xi is trying to build a transportation monopoly on a global scale.  It isn't only backed by Xi personally, it is also now enshrined in the Communist party constitution (!).  In other words, it's going to get done.
  • By the time this round of investment is completed, a majority of the global economy will be in economic thrall to China.  Subsequent iterations ensure that the US will become a second tier economic power.  All within 20 years.

Unfortunately, due to a self-inflicted wound (Trump is merely a symptom), the US couldn't be in a worse position to counter this effort.  Decades of blind adherence to economic and social neoliberalism has shattered US cohesion along all three vectors: moral, mental, and physical.   The result has been intractable economic stagnation, social turmoil, and political chaos.  Even worse is on the horizon: the US is careening towards identity authoritarianism.  In time, the US may be able to regain stability.  Regardless, it's unlikely the US will find a way through this crisis fast enough to mount a successful conventional counter to China's challenge.  So, what is to be done under the assumption the US will eventually recover, but not soon enough for conventional efforts?

One belt one road

Delaying China

One solution is to mount a rearguard action -- a method of delaying an advancing enemy when your forces are in retreat.  An action that buys time for the US to regroup and regain cohesion.  The US faced a similar situation re; the Soviet Union in '79 after the invasion of Afghanistan.  In that case, support for Afghan insurgents kept the Soviets occupied while the US recovered (Carter, inflation, Iran, etc.).  In this case, the rearguard action would be the disruption of China's plans for one belt one road.  This could be done inexpensively and with very little manpower or visibility.  How? 

  • Create groups that operate like global guerrillas.  Small groups that operate independently w/o oversight.  More letters of marque than special operations.    
  • In the short term, disrupt the Chinese construction effort.  Double and treble construction costs by delaying timeliness and forcing increased security efforts.   Drive up the costs of financing.  Drive away subcontractors.  
  • Next, force the Chinese to physically and logically protect the entire system, from roads to ports to trains, from disruption.   As my analysis of Lawrence of Arabia shows, it's more damaging to partially disrupt a system than to completely break it.  Keep up the pressure -- with the ability of systems disruption to generate a million to one return on investment, this is sustainable.  

Sincerely,

John Robb

Writing on a crisp fall day in New England

PS:  Doesn't the US risk more from disruption than China?  No. The US doesn't have a choice.  If it doesn't act while this system is being built (when it is the most vulnerable to disruption), the US will cede global dominance to China forever.  China is creating the equivalent of "Standard Oil stranglehold" on the global economy and once established it will likely become too big/too entrenched to roll back through global guerrillas.

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cherjr
50 days ago
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Что-то Робб понервничал
48.840867,2.324885
bogorad
50 days ago
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Moscow, Russia
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2 public comments
invinciblegod
50 days ago
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"Create groups that operate like global guerrillas.  Small groups that operate independently w/o oversight... forcing increased security efforts... orce the Chinese to physically and logically protect the entire system, from roads to ports to trains, from disruption"

So the suggestion to counter an economic power grab is literal war? Seems counterproductive.
skorgu
50 days ago
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A bit sensational but interesting.

As pre-orders open, Apple says iPhone X screen replacement will cost $279, compared to $169 for iPhone 8 Plus; other out-of-warranty repairs will cost $549 (Jacob Kastrenakes/The Verge)

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The iPhone X went on sale today, and with it, Apple released some information about the phone’s repair pricing — and like the phone itself, it gets expensive. If you don’t have the extended warranty, a screen replacement will cost $279. That’s more than twice the price of an iPhone 6 screen replacement ($129) and about 65 percent higher than a new iPhone 8 screen ($169). The pricing was first spotted by MacRumors.

If that sounds high, you should be careful not to damage an iPhone X in any other way: all other out-of-warranty repairs will cost $549. Again, that’s a lot more than what other recent iPhones cost to repair. iPhone 8 repairs cost $349 and 8 Plus repairs cost $399. That means if you crack the glass back of the iPhone X (or the iPhone 8), you might just want to live with it.

Apple’s extended warranty, AppleCare+, often looks like a pricey upsell. But for iPhone X buyers, it seems like it might be a necessary safety net. Apple’s warranty costs $199 for the iPhone X (up from $129 for the iPhone 8 and $149 for the 8 Plus); but while the warranty itself is more expensive, warranty service fees (which apply only when Apple is repairing something with “accidental damage”) don’t go up at all. So an iPhone X can still get a $29 screen repair if it’s under warranty, and it can still get a $99 repair for anything else under AppleCare+, too.

Buying AppleCare+ is usually more of a gamble. On the iPhone 8, for instance, paying to replace your broken screen once out of warranty would be cheaper than having to replace your screen once with the warranty. The warranty would only be worth it if something else went wrong with your phone within three years — though that’s certainly a possibility (I’ve bought and used the warranty on iPhones before, like when my 5S’s camera stopped working).

For the iPhone X, on the other hand, you could crack and replace the screen twice under warranty ($257) and still pay less than a single out-of-warranty screen replacement ($279). And given that you’re already spending over $1,000 on the phone, that’s not a bad insurance policy, since it also fully covers repairs for when the device just stops working on its own.

While the repair prices look high, it’s not all that surprising to see them jump up so much. Apple has to go to Samsung to get the OLED panels on the front of the iPhone X. Because Samsung is the only company that can supply those screens, they’re going to be expensive. And because they’re likely being supplied in limited quantities — due to production complexities like carving out that notch — the price on these is going to be even higher.

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bogorad
50 days ago
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жесть
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